Studies have demonstrated that CBD has a low affinity for the CB1 receptors, but even at low concentrations, CBD decreases G-protein activity (3). CB1 receptors are expressed on many glutamatergic synapses that have been implicated in seizure threshold modulation. CBD may act at CB1 receptors to inhibit glutamate release (4). Studies have shown changes in the expression of CB1 receptors during epileptogenesis and after recurrent seizures (5). CB1 receptor expression is upregulated at GABAergic synapses and shown to be downregulated at glutamatergic synapses in epilepsy, contributing to lowering seizure thresholds.
The spray contains 400 mg of CBD and CBDa (a carboxylated form of CBD), for £24.95. The bottle contains 10 ml of liquid and, as there are 80 sprays, each spray contains 5mg of CBD. According to CBD Life, taking CBD sublingually enables the cannabinoid to travel directly to the bloodstream without being subject to metabolic breakdown in the digestive system.
I recently was a guest at a medical marijuana educational event that highlighted the work of researcher Michael Backes. During his presentation he made a statement about CBD that I have never heard anywhere else that CBD is “regulating” (my word) the effects of THC. I asked the Nurse Practitioner at the event, Ivy Lou Hibbitt of Certicann.com, what he meant by that and she said it was her understanding of Michael’s comment that he takes CBD to reduce the psychoactive effects of THC. Has this property of CBD, that it can lessen psychoactive effects, ever been researched elsewhere?

This method proved successful for years, but high-strength concentrates would sometimes crystallise and clog the very small orifice through which the oil was to be delivered. Recognising the issue and the fact that most customers needed a higher dose to be delivered quickly, CannabiGold further developed its packaging to launch a side nozzle. This pump can deliver a higher dose of the oil (4 times what it used to) in one go and do it very easily under the tongue, without having to use a mirror to ensure one is getting the right number of drops. The easy dropper technology has boosted the good reputation of the already popular cylinder bottles because they’re easy and safe to use wherever you go with no leaking and a very convenient pocket size. Each of their 12g bottles now contains 100 pumps (full doses) of CBD, making it the easiest and most convenient system available, truly suitable for all use, including travel. Visit the CannabiGold collection.
Success stories like Oliver’s are everywhere, but there’s not a lot of data to back up those results. That’s because CBD comes from cannabis and, like nearly all other parts of the plant, is categorized by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as a Schedule 1 drug—the most restrictive classification. (Others on that list: heroin, Ecstasy, and peyote.) This classification, which cannabis advocates have tried for years to change, keeps cannabis-derived products, including CBD, from being properly studied in the U.S.

These reports suffered from a number of design flaws, including incomplete baseline quantification of baseline seizure frequency, indeterminate time periods for outcome determination and, in some cases, inadequate (or missing) statistical analysis—in general, a lack of sufficient detail to adequately evaluate and interpret the findings. Limitations aside, several studies did report that administration of adjunctive CBD did not result in meaningful changes in seizure frequency (11–13).
Under federal law, cannabis (from which both CBD and marijuana are derived) is illegal everywhere, although the laws against it aren’t generally enforced in states that have legalized marijuana. Some manufacturers claim that CBD culled from legally imported industrial hemp, which has little to no THC, is fine to ship across the U.S., but many experts disagree, noting that because hemp comes from the same species as marijuana, cannabis sativa, all CBD falls under the DEA’s Schedule 1 designation. “This creative interpretation of the law runs afoul of reality,” says the Brookings Institution, a Washington, DC, think tank.
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