While CBD may be effective at treating some conditions, the exaggeration of claims results in a situation where it is bound to be called snake oil by some, and reasonably so. To be taken seriously, proponents need to start being real about what it has been shown to treat and what it has not. And we really must not allow one-off studies, rat studies, or anecdotes to be counted as real evidence.
Thank you. I am 81 and started the CBD drops night and morning. I sleep better and no longer suffer the excruciating pain from diverticulitis. I saw somewhere that for my asthma I need the THC so got some (totally illegal here in South Africa). I think it is helping. The diagnosis of COPD was made some years ago and as a health psychologist I do all I can to remain healthy for my 97th birthday!! (Both my grandmother and greatgrandmother did so I believe I will too).
Scam CBD sellers tend to manufacture low-grade oils via ethanol (or other solvent-based) extraction, in what is little better than trying to do it yourself in your basement. The result is a liquid that contains a little CBD (along with some other cannabinoids and terpenes), but not in the quantities needed to be effective in terms of any legitimate medicinal function. Moreover, these solvent-based extracts can contain unnecessary and potentially harmful components — after all, scam artists are not going to reveal the REAL ingredients, are they?
Because CBD oil is non-psychotropic and derived from low or zero THC hemp/cannabis strains it is generally defined as a dietary supplement and therefore is legal in most States and countries so should not pose any problem at a professional or competition level. Please consult your professional organization before assuming that this is the case in your jurisdiction. The United Nations – World Health Organisation (WHO) recently (14 Dec 2017) stated that Cannabidiol (CBD Oil) should no longer be scheduled as a controlled substance. In 2017 the World Anti-doping Agency (WADA) and United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA) approved CBD for use by athletes in over 600 sports.
I have read about studies from Europe (not very specific I know) that suggest CBD might work better for some people if combined with some level of THC. Also, the getting high part can be helpful, although not for everybody, of course. A second point – I don’t hear very much about CBD eliminating or almost eliminating pain for people with severe pain. Helpful, but, so far at least, it doesn’t seem that CBDs can replace opioids or substantially reduce pain for all chronic pain patients. Maybe someday. 
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