Thankfully this doesn’t apply to me personally, but studies have shown that CBD oil can be very beneficial to those who suffer from Diabetes. It does this by decreasing insulin resistance. The exact science behind this is still being researched, but some scientists believe that it is related to a cannabinoid called THCV, which has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity.
If you haven’t been bombarded with CBD marketing or raves about it from friends, get ready. This extract—which comes from either marijuana or its industrial cousin, hemp—is popping up everywhere. There are CBD capsules, tinctures, and liquids for vaping plus CBD-infused lotions, beauty products, snacks, coffee, and even vaginal suppositories. Already some 1,000 brands of CBD products are available in stores—and online in states that don’t have lenient cannabis laws. This is a tiny fraction of what’s to come: The CBD market is poised to exceed $22 billion by 2022, per the Chicago-based research firm Brightfield Group.
Dr. Cohen has found that chronic conditions including autoimmune diseases and pain syndromes can be helped with a 6-mg under-the-tongue tincture (the fastest delivery system) or a 25-mg capsule taken twice a day. Dosages for topical products like lotions are especially hard to determine—there’s no clarity on how much CBD gets into the system through the skin.
Because CBD oil is non-psychotropic and derived from low or zero THC hemp/cannabis strains it is generally defined as a dietary supplement and therefore is legal in most States and countries so should not pose any problem at a professional or competition level. Please consult your professional organization before assuming that this is the case in your jurisdiction. The United Nations – World Health Organisation (WHO) recently (14 Dec 2017) stated that Cannabidiol (CBD Oil) should no longer be scheduled as a controlled substance. In 2017 the World Anti-doping Agency (WADA) and United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA) approved CBD for use by athletes in over 600 sports.

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.
I have read about studies from Europe (not very specific I know) that suggest CBD might work better for some people if combined with some level of THC. Also, the getting high part can be helpful, although not for everybody, of course. A second point – I don’t hear very much about CBD eliminating or almost eliminating pain for people with severe pain. Helpful, but, so far at least, it doesn’t seem that CBDs can replace opioids or substantially reduce pain for all chronic pain patients. Maybe someday.
If you answered “yes” to step 2. Talk to your doctor as there are several ways you can avoid CBD interacting with your prescription medication. Even high doses of CBD often cause little to no issues due to body chemistry. By monitoring with regular blood tests, even if CBD inhibits too many CYP enzymes, side effects can be prevented by catching the interaction before any harm occurs.
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