While CBD may be effective at treating some conditions, the exaggeration of claims results in a situation where it is bound to be called snake oil by some, and reasonably so. To be taken seriously, proponents need to start being real about what it has been shown to treat and what it has not. And we really must not allow one-off studies, rat studies, or anecdotes to be counted as real evidence.
Perhaps the most enjoyable way to take CBD is through CBD edibles. CBD edibles are food products that have been infused with hemp-derived CBD. Generally, CBD edibles contain a lower serving, usually 5 to 10 mg of CBD each, allowing you to easily increase or decrease your intake based on your individual wellness needs. CBD edibles come in the form of delicious CBD gummies and bite-sized CBD energy chews.

Hemp-based CBD oil is NOT, I repeat, is NOT the same as raw oil produced from the whole marijuana plant. I’m getting so sick and tired of the marketing out there, I could scream. Cannabidiol from marijuana plants contains THC-A, which is not intoxicating — heating it will convert it to THC-C. This is how large amounts of THC-A can be consumed — the oil from raw marijuana plants has a higher safety profile, too. Once this market is REGULATED (and it will be), there will be very clear distinctions. At the moment, it’s up to the consumer to do his/her homework. Until then, please don’t fall for some of this marketing. Sure, Hemp CBD oil can be useful, but people are being duped into thinking it’s the same thing with the same benefits. IT IS NOT!
Success stories like Oliver’s are everywhere, but there’s not a lot of data to back up those results. That’s because CBD comes from cannabis and, like nearly all other parts of the plant, is categorized by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as a Schedule 1 drug—the most restrictive classification. (Others on that list: heroin, Ecstasy, and peyote.) This classification, which cannabis advocates have tried for years to change, keeps cannabis-derived products, including CBD, from being properly studied in the U.S.
The reason so many people are interested in cannabis products that don’t make them high, proponents say, is that CBD helps with everything from pain and nausea to rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, Crohn’s disease, and dementia. CBD is anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, antibacterial, immunosuppressive, and more, says Joseph Cohen, DO, a cannabis doctor in Boulder, CO.
Taking CBD oil solely from the stalks is an arduous, wasteful, and expensive — the stalks contain small traces of cannabinoids. It’s doable, but most companies don’t do it because it’s not profitable in the slightest, and the DEA is completely aware of this. However, they can’t do a thing about it as Congress has barred them from using any federal funds to go after medical marijuana — which includes hemp by default.
If you live in a state where CBD is legal for your condition, it’s best to buy it from a state-regulated dispensary. But even there, oversight is uneven. “I feel safe being a cannabis consumer in Colorado, since the state tracks everything from seed to sale, but I didn’t the first few years after cannabis became legal,” when the rules were still taking shape, says Robyn Griggs Lawrence, the Boulder author of The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook, which features recipes for cannabis edibles.
Most human studies of CBD have been done on people who have seizures, and the FDA recently approved the first CBD-based drug, Epidiolex, for rare forms of epilepsy. Clinical trials for other conditions are promising, but tiny. In one Brazilian study published in 2011 of people with generalized social anxiety disorder, for example, taking a 600-mg dose of CBD (higher than a typical dose from a tincture) lessened discomfort more than a placebo, but only a dozen people were given the pill.
I have read about studies from Europe (not very specific I know) that suggest CBD might work better for some people if combined with some level of THC. Also, the getting high part can be helpful, although not for everybody, of course. A second point – I don’t hear very much about CBD eliminating or almost eliminating pain for people with severe pain. Helpful, but, so far at least, it doesn’t seem that CBDs can replace opioids or substantially reduce pain for all chronic pain patients. Maybe someday. 
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