Customer Service: We’ve always received fast, informative responses to our queries about products and practices, but there are definitely customers out there who have not. A quick perusal of reviews shows customers who had issues with unaddressed orders. It’s hard to know exactly what the problem is in these situations, but the company’s strict return policy (seven days for unopened products only) probably doesn’t help. It should be noted that the company has a solid base of very satisfied customers as well.
Is the product full spectrum or an isolate? We believe full spectrum CBD oils have greater therapeutic value. Some people talk about the “entourage effect,” or multiple cannabinoids working together. Experts we talk to support the idea of whole-plant therapy. Look for full-spectrum oils. Be careful not to get duped into buying products that use words like “pure” or “potent.” See past the marketing.
1. Devinsky O, Cilio MR, Cross H, Fernandez-Ruiz J, French J, Hill C, Katz R, Di Marzo V, Jutras-Aswad D, Notcutt WG, Martinez-Orgado J, Robson PJ, Rohrback BG, Thiele E, Whalley B, Friedman D. Cannabidiol: Pharmacology and potential therapeutic role in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Epilepsia. 2014;55:791–802. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
It’s also important to select CBD oil products based on your concentration preferences. Some forms of CBD oil – such as vapors and tinctures – normally have higher-than-average concentrations, whereas sprays and topicals tend to have lower concentrations. Remember: higher concentration means more pronounced effects, but not necessarily mean higher quality.
Oils are hot in the beauty world. As a beauty editor, I’ve slathered everything short of butter onto my face: argan, coconut, rosehip, sandalwood, chia, neroli, calendula, mandarin, macadamia, rice bran, seabuckthorn, patchouli, grapefruit seed, sesame seed, soybean, sweet almond, pomegranate seed, lemon myrtle, sunflower seed—even extra virgin olive oil from my pantry when I was desperate. I’ve washed my face with oil-based cleansers, and dabbed expensive mixtures being sold as “face oils” onto my skin in hopes of achieving that Instagram-ready glow. Contrary to popular belief, the right oil is actually good for your face and won’t clog your pores. Your skin needs a reasonable amount of oil to do its business; as a matter of fact, if you scrub away all your natural face oil (as I was prone to do with rubbing alcohol as a frustrated and misguided pizza-faced teen), you may actually be prone to more breakouts as your skin tries to make up for the imbalance. As cannabis meets up with the mainstream beauty world, cannabidiol (CBD) oil may be the next big thing.

The first time I came across CBD was when I was visiting my brother in San Antonio, Texas 2 years back. The one day I had some serious back pain, My brother’s neighbour suggested that I should try CBD oil for my pain as it helps his mom with her cancer pain, and directed me to a local CBD shop in San Antonio where I bought a 2000mg CBD oil. In the beginning, I was a sceptic, but it worked so well that I ordered three more bottles to last me for a few months. I must say that also felt relaxed but could do my work with no issues as it didn’t make me high. To date, I’m still using CBD oil for my pain and came off pain medications completely.

I recently was a guest at a medical marijuana educational event that highlighted the work of researcher Michael Backes. During his presentation he made a statement about CBD that I have never heard anywhere else that CBD is “regulating” (my word) the effects of THC. I asked the Nurse Practitioner at the event, Ivy Lou Hibbitt of Certicann.com, what he meant by that and she said it was her understanding of Michael’s comment that he takes CBD to reduce the psychoactive effects of THC. Has this property of CBD, that it can lessen psychoactive effects, ever been researched elsewhere?
In a study investigating CBD-drug interactions, CBD’s relationship with the Cytochrome P450-complex enzyme proved especially intriguing. This enzyme is the active compound in over half of the pharmaceutical medications being prescribed today, and it is the method by which the drug can treat physical symptoms. It is also responsible for the processes in which a drug is activated, or “metabolized” within the liver.
Mandy, I believe your results are not all that unsual, but not very popular right now as people are looking for answers they couldnt find elsewhere and hope. Unfortuately i have given it to my anxious dog twice now and a year apart sold by two different companies. The second being a more reputable and a higher quality organic company. Both times my dog became increasingly MORE agressive to other dogs. I had to stop. I dont see anyone else put there who have had similar results. I think people should be made awhere (as you said) everyone is different and will not be guaranteed the same results.

A study published by David Cheng, Postdoctoral Scientist, Neuroscience Research, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia, says that CBD has a potential as a preventive measure against symptoms of Alzheimer’s. This presents yet another exciting development for medical researchers, given the persistent challenges to finding effective solutions for this condition.


As more and more states legalize the use of marijuana, a product known as CBD oil has surged in popularity. A chemical compound found in the cannabis plant, CBD, or cannabidiol, is non-intoxicating and does not cause the noticeable euphoric effects associated with tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC, another marijuana compound). Products marketed as CBD oil may contain THC.
So far, no known calculator can give an exact dosage of CBD oil one can take. However, rough estimates are there and can help you get started. Suggestions indicate that an ideal dose should fall between 1mgs-6mgs for every 10 pounds of your body weight. However, you need to consider the amount of pain you’re experiencing and the disease’s severity. If the intensity is high, you may need to increase the dosage and vice versa.
Over the past few years, increasing public and political pressure has supported legalization of medical marijuana. One of the main thrusts in this effort has related to the treatment of refractory epilepsy—especially in children with Dravet syndrome—using cannabidiol (CBD). Despite initiatives in numerous states to at least legalize possession of CBD oil for treating epilepsy, little published evidence is available to prove or disprove the efficacy and safety of CBD in patients with epilepsy. This review highlights some of the basic science theory behind the use of CBD, summarizes published data on clinical use of CBD for epilepsy, and highlights issues related to the use of currently available CBD products.
Cannabidiol pharmacological effects are mediated through G protein coupled receptors, cannabinoid type I (CB1) and cannabinoid type II (CB2), which are highly expressed in the hippocampus and other parts of the central nervous system (2). When activated, CB1 receptors inhibit synaptic transmission through action on voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels, which are known to modulate epileptiform and seizure activity (3). CB2 receptors are primarily expressed in the immune system and have limited expression in the central nervous system. The effects of CBD are CB2 receptor independent (3).

Some CBD manufacturers have come under government scrutiny for wild, indefensible claims, such that CBD is a cure-all for cancer, which it is not. We need more research but CBD may be prove to be an option for managing anxiety, insomnia, and chronic pain. Without sufficient high-quality evidence in human studies we can’t pinpoint effective doses, and because CBD is currently is mostly available as an unregulated supplement, it’s difficult to know exactly what you are getting. If you decide to try CBD, talk with your doctor — if for no other reason than to make sure it won’t affect other medications you are taking.
Using rigorous review methodology, Gloss and Vickery conclude that based on the low quality of the reports available, there is insufficient data available to draw any conclusions regarding the efficacy and or long-term safety of CBD in treating epilepsy (11). From the data available, it does appear that daily doses of 200 to 300 mg were safe in this small group of patients for a short period of time (14).
I seem to be developing breathing issues since taking a low dose CBD hemp oil. PureScience 400. Heaviness in chest, hard to breath and catch a deep breath. Nasal stuffiness and head pressure. Back of throat feels like it’s swollen and almost restricting breath. Was taking it at night for restless legs anxiety have MS and it was helping me and I was getting peaceful sleep until these appeared. Had been taking it for about 2 months. Any info. On hemp allergies?
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