Known to aid in the symptoms of severe illnesses and disorders such as epilepsy and depression, CBD has been found to counteract many negative side effects of certain medications. However, evidence has also suggested that CBD can interfere with the therapeutic benefits of some medications when taken simultaneously and can either increase or decrease the drug’s potency.
Unless you've been tuned out to the beauty world these last few months, odds are you've heard of an ingredient called CBD (short for cannabidiol). The buzzy ingredient, which, no, won't get you high, even if ingested as an oral tincture or supplement, has now evolved into a bonafide skin-care trend, with brands offering a luxe spin on what used to be a highly niche category. "With an impressive and evergrowing number of studies finding CBD to be a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory among many other properties, it is now being used to treat pain, anxiety, spasms, and much more," New York City-based aesthetician Jeannel Astarita tells Allure.

However, if it was sourced from actual marijuana (i.e. cannabis that contains more than 2% THC by volume), then it is technically illegal. Most of the best CBD oils for pain that you find in dispensaries in states like Colorado, California, and Washington (as well as other states where weed is legal) will have been extracted from marijuana plants — not industrial hemp plants. Unfortunately, this means that these products are not allowed to be sold online and shipped across state lines to “non-legal” states.
Does the use of CBD oil have side effects? CBD is a natural substance, a cannabinoid from the cannabis/hemp plant, whose positive properties on the human organism are not only attributed by scientists and physicians but by people all over the world who have experienced its healing and therapeutic abilities. Even though it is a natural substance and because of the fact that we have our own cannabinoid system (endocannabinoid system), it looks as if it has been created for us, nevertheless the question arises whether CBD has side effects. And if so, which one? Under which circumstances? And at what dose?
Truth be told, one of the biggest draws to using CBD oil for pain has been the fact that it has little distinguishable side-effects or contraindications with other medications. In fact, in a massive report that was published by the World Health Organization during last year’s 2017 Expert Committee on Drug Dependence, it was (finally) declared to the world that CBD is a “safe, well tolerated [compound, which] is not associated with any significant adverse public health effects.”
Some studies have investigated the role of CBD in preventing cancer cell growth, but research is still in its early stages. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) says that CBD may help alleviate cancer symptoms and cancer treatment side effects. However, the NCI doesn’t fully endorse any form of cannabis as a cancer treatment. The action of CBD that’s promising for cancer treatment is its ability to moderate inflammation and change how cell reproduce. CBD has the effect of reducing the ability of some types of tumor cells to reproduce.
Sorry to hear that CBD didn’t prove to be the solution we were hoping for. Remember that our return policy guarantees products, so bring your bottle back into the store and we’ll give you full in-store credit. We’d be happy too, to help you keep looking for a solution. You are 100% right — CBD isn’t a miracle cure-all, and because we’re all different, CBD works great for many people, but not for everyone. Stop back in — we’re here to help!
People who experience psychosis may produce too much or even too little cannabinoids (from overactive dopamine receptors). CBD is milder than our internal cannabinoids and helps to re-establish a balance of cannabinoids in the brain. CBD also helps lower inflammation, which is often increased in schizophrenia. THC, on the other hand, is stronger than our internal cannabinoids (anandamide and 2-AG), this way potentially triggering psychosis [46, 48].

At this time, there does seem to be a growing body of basic pharmacologic data suggesting there may be a role for CBD, especially in the treatment of refractory epilepsy. However, given the lack of well-controlled trials, we must also ask if we are getting ahead of ourselves. Clearly, this is an emotionally and politically charged issue. If this were any other uninvestigated pharmaceutical compound, would we feel as compelled to make the agent widely available before statistically valid class 1 evidence was available for review? Until data from well-designed clinical trials are available and reliable, and standardized CBD products that are produced using GMP are available, caution must be exercised in any consideration of using CBD for the treatment of epilepsy. In the meantime, based upon promising preliminary data, further clinical research should be wholeheartedly pursued.
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Due to my other issues, I’m extremely out of shape even though I’m not much overweight. I can’t even walk for 10 minutes without causing myself considerable pain. I do everything I can to avoid traveling in vehicles and only do so if it’s less than a 15 minute ride because it’s all my anxiety and other issues can manage. I’m only 39 and I feel like I’m not even a living person anymore and I’m sick of it. I’m desperate for a solution and mental health therapy, physical therapy, various prescriptions that have come and gone over the years have not given me much help at all. My body doesn’t react well to pharmaceutical pain relievers. I’ve been given many prescriptions over the years that I’ve stopped because they just didn’t work and they gave me weird reactions. None of those reactions were “serious” reactions, but they made me anxious and freaked me out. I’ve been prescribed several different medications over the years for my stomach issues and various nausea related issues (including Protonix, Zantac, Prevacid and Prilosec for my GERD issues, and Phenergan, Zofran and an anti-motion sickness patch I can’t remember the name of.) And I’m sick of being sick… I’m sick of taking so much nausea medication that makes me sleepy. I’m sick of being afraid of everything.
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