Since all pharmacologically active substances are not 100% risk-free, it is prudent to assume that even though CBD doesn’t have psychoactive effects like THC, it surely has some other effects on the body. As with all products, it is important to fully grasp the basics of what CBD does to your body (pharmacodynamics) and what your body does to CBD (pharmacokinetics.)

The answer to this question may not be very conclusive. The biochemistry of every individual is different and CBD may react differently with every person. Some people may experience effects acutely while others may experience these effects later. Irrespective of these differences, clinical observations show that the effects of CBD oil can last for between four to six hours though the onset of action for CBD is just 20 to 30 minutes. 

Cannabidiol is the major nonpsychoactive component of Cannabis sativa. Over the centuries, a number of medicinal preparations derived from C. sativa have been employed for a variety of disorders, including gout, rheumatism, malaria, pain, and fever. These preparations were widely employed as analgesics by Western medical practitioners in the 19th century (1). More recently, there is clinical evidence suggesting efficacy in HIV-associated neuropathic pain, as well as spasms associated with multiple sclerosis (1).
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